History of the Sanatorium: Oct 9 1907

Tribune Oct 9 1907

This is a large article that appears to have been on the front page of the Rockville Tribune. There are several other interesting articles from the time also on this page that may warrant investigation after going through all of the Sanatorium’s material.

Newspaper: Rockville Tribune
Published: Oct 9, 1907

ARE ROCKVILLE’S GUESTS

Men Who Will Buy the Land and Build the Tuberculosis Hospital

” The Indiana tuberculosis hospital commission will inspect the site on Little Racoon today. The members arrived last night and were given an informal reception at the Parke bank. Representative citizens called for the purpose of welcoming the commission to Rockville, and to urge the selection of the site three miles east of here.

The commission is composed of five members, three Republicans and two Democrats. Dr. Henry Moore, of Indianapolis, is president. Dr. Moore is the father of R. E. Moore, member of our town board. He was a surgeon in the army, and after the war practiced for many years. He was a construction engineer on the Midland railroad, and has had wide experience in the purchase of lands for railroad companies. When the State re-located the deaf and dumb institute, Dr. Moore was employed to secure the land.

“Today the commission will go in automobiles at the expense of the town of Rockville to inspect the two sites, returning to be guests of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac R. Strouse at dinner.”

Tribune Oct 9 1907

Hon. J. Norman Babcock, treasurer of the commission, resides at Topeka, Lagrange county. He is a banker and farmer. Mr. Babcock has represented Lagrange county in the Legislature, and his son, the author of the Babcock insurance bill, is now the representative of that county. The elder Babcock is well known throughout the State as a lecturer at farmer’ institutes. He is a capital story-teller, and usually has some humorous anecdote or experience to relate, to the great enjoyment of other members of the board.

William S. Holman, of Aurora, is one of the two Democratic members. He is a son of the late Congressman Holman who, for thirty years, without a break, represented his district in Congress, and became known to all Americans as the “Watchdog of the Treasury.” For many years Mr. Holman has practiced law in Aurora. In his young manhood he assisted in surveying the then territory of Colorado. In those days the Indians were at times hostile, and during his experience as a surveyor it was often necessary to lay down surveyor’s instruments and pick up a rifle. Although Mr. Holman has many of the characteristics which made his father so popular, he has never engaged actively in politics.

Benjamin F. Bennet, of Greensburg, represents the Eastern part of the State on the commission. He is a lawyer of long and successful practice. He was born and reared on one of the best farms in Decatur county, is a land owner himself, and knows the value of real estate at a glance. He is as painstaking and thorough in his duties on the commission as he is in his legal practice. Like his lawyer contemporary on the board, Mr. Holman, he is not a politician. He is a man of the highest standing in his community, and is rendering most efficient service to the State as a member of the commission.

The secretary esteems it a high honor to be associated with the above named gentlemen in this service to his native State.

Today the commission will go in automobiles at the expense of the town of Rockville to inspect the two sites, returning to be guests of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac R. Strouse at dinner. From here they will go to the Shades of Death, which tract is offered for sale to the State, and from there to Bunker Hill, Miami county.

Automobiles were furnished by John Adams, L. W. Brown and S. F. Max Puett, and a touring car was hired from Terre Haute. It will be seen by the commission that the people of Rockville earnestly desire the hospital, and, unlike the citizens of some other places visited by the board, are decidedly in sympathy with this great work of State charity. “

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