History of the Sanatorium: Oct 1909

Oct 1909

Newspaper: Unknown
Published: Oct 1909

Unknown

” not have sold to a private individual, and, Theodore Jessup, although he had just built a nice home agreed to part with it. James H. Hyer promptly optioned his land for the hospital, and when It was found what Governor Hanly demanded 100 acres of rich bottom land, John W. Adams sold for $90 an acre an eighty of bottom land worth more than $100 per acre. Edgar Adams at this stage of the proceedings let fifteen acres of his bottom land go at $85 per acre. Claude Kent sold his tract at a reasonable price. In fact, all of the land was secured without any dispute except one piece of forty-two acres.

When it came to purchasing the site the commission had only about $25,000 for that purpose, or rather what was the limit which had been set. Then the people of Rockville and vicinity, in order to make a more attractive offer to the State, in competition with, Spencer, Laurel and Greencastle, set about to raise the money to pay all over $24.000 that it might take to buy the so-called Rockville site. J. M Johns drew up a bond to the State, who was signed by the men whose names are attached.

Howard MaxwellD. D. HoaglandJohn S. McFaddin
C. F. SapenfieldJ. M. JohnsAttellus H. Dooley
Dick H. OttRufus DooleyOtt Hardware Co
W. H. CraigS. F. Max PuettSamuel Coble
George L. TofauteS. T. CatlinA. H. Stark
A. BrockwayL. W. BrownF. H Nichols
Bert CarlisleW. H. DukesC. T. Wall
Charles A. MarisWm. E. FergusonChas. B. Harrison
L. N. GrinleyS. S. HarrisJ. H. Spencer
T. L. JohnsonS. H. ChesserLeslie W. Harrison
S. StrouseBert DixonW. H Gillum
Omer DaviesJ. H. LeeO. E. Maddox
A. R. ShonkwilerR. E. SwopeEdgar Jerome
John A. LinebargerL. B. HumphriesAlbert M. Adams
E S BrubeckDan D. JonesE. Marks
Jacob S. WhiteF. H LoweryC. C. Morris
NeetW. S. FergusonH. A. Henderson
William ArdErn OhaverJ. S. Spencer
E. M. CarterJ. L. UppHenry Grubb
I. N. LowryEwing ChapmanAl Kretch
J. Carl RutterR. E. MooreChas. E. Lambert
C. M. HunnicuttG. C. MillerM. Williams
R. A. ConnerlyJ. M. EllettW. N. Carlisle
I. A. PickardH. B. ButlerHenry Daniels
C. W. OverpeckJ. Edgar AllenW. B. Collings
F. W. LeathermanF. E. StrouseJohn Gleason
Peter PenceJ. J. DanielsJohn W. Adams
J. A. TolinD. M. Carlisle 
Names of the men who signed the State bond to raise more money for the Sanatorium

Never did a town and its neighboring citizens work more faithfully to accomplish a common purpose. Not a thing was left undone that might serve to put our community and our site in a favorable attitude. When it came to the final inspection of the sites by the Governor and the commission it was planned to visit Rockville after having seen the other sites.  In Greencastle the Governor and his crew were met with a convoy of authorities. By some skillful maneuvering it was timed so as to have a noon-day luncheon in picnic style when about half way to the Rockville site. It was the first balmy day of early spring. Some Rockville ladies had gone to Greencastle, and on the way over had selected the spot for the dinner. Plenty of milk, buttermilk and whatever was needed from the farm house was engaged. It is needless to say that the surprise thus perpetrated on the Governor and the commission was most agreeable. At the site huge jars of cool lemonade awaited the State’s officials when they had completed their inspection. Then followed the elaborate evening meal at the Tarke hotel:

“Never did a town and its neighboring citizens work more faithfully to accomplish a common purpose.

Oct 1909

Although nearly all of our people did all in their power towards helping the enterprise, many of them did it as a duty, never dreaming that we would get the hospital. The secretary, from the moment that he saw the land could be purchased, never doubted that Rockville would “land.” He had seen her people do things before. When a boy he saw the greatest soldiers’ reunion ever held in the State carried in such a successful conclusion that it is still spoken of as one of the greatest events in the history of the State. He knew of the peculiar gift our people have for doing things when they all take a hand. He knew when they got to work as they did that they would not fall. And they did not fail. “

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