History of the Sanatorium: May 6 1908

Newspaper article Tribune 5/6/1908

The location of the Indiana State Sanatorium has been chosen as the Rockville site on the Little Racoon! The very end of the article has been cut off, but perhaps we will locate the final closing comments.

Newspaper: Tribune
Published: May 6 1908

BIG STATE INSTITUTION

To be Located Near Rockville-Interurban Railroad Next.

” The Indiana Tuberculosis hospital will be built on the Little Raccoon site, three miles east of Rockville, according to the decision of the Hospital Commission and Governor Hanly. The decision was reached last Friday afternoon at 5:30 o’clock by the commission, but it was not made public until Saturday morning, as the Governor, whose approval was necessary, was not in his office at that time, and the joint conference was deferred until Saturday at 10 a. m. The Governor heartily concurred in the decision of the commission, which was to locate the site on conditions that the water supply was adequate and that a switch should connect the hospital with the Vandalia railroad at Sand Creek. These conditions, however, would be imposed on any place chosen by the commission.

Rockville, as the site is called, was chosen over twenty-two places visited by the full commission and over fifty places visited by members of the commission.

Tribune, May 6 1908

Rockville, as the site is called, was chosen over twenty-two places visited by the full commission and over fifty places visited by members of the commission. Four towns, near which sites were located, were in the final contest: Laurel, Spencer, Greencastle and Rockville, The impression was general that Greencastle would be chosen, and this brought out a spirited contest at that town which culminated Friday afternoon when two delegations appeared before the commission. One delegation – the larger-brought with it a petition signed by 500 citizens, asking that the hospital be located at Greencastle. The other, headed by President Edwin H. Hughes, presented a protest on behalf of DePauw university. In closing his remarks, Dr. Hughes said that seventy years ago, when the location of Asbury university was contemplated, the contest was between Greencastle and Rockville. Greencastle won, but he expressed the hope that in this contest Rockville would win.

After the Greencastle delegation had withdrawn, Rev. D. D. Hoagland, W. J. White, Dick H. Ott, Frank H. Nichols, and later, Jacob S. White, appeared before the commission. They presented two sites one embracing the farm of Charles Guilliams, south of the Bellmore road, and the other containing 80 acres owned by John Adams, north of the road. With the options and plats was bond signed by 106 citizens and tax- payers of Adams township, guaranteeing that the site chosen should not cost more than $24,900. Rev. Hoagland made a brief talk to the commission, after which the plats were considered. At this juncture Governor Hanly appeared, and the Rockville party, with the commission and Governor Hanly, had an informal session of about ten minutes, when the representatives of our town withdrew. Before leaving the room, Governor Hanly gave the commission his view of the situation.

When it came time to vote on the location, Commissioner Babcock moved that the selection of Rockville be made unanimous. Commissioner Strouse suggested that a ballot be taken. This was done. Rockville received three votes and Laurel two. The selection of Rockville, was then made unanimous.

The commission unanimously selected what was called the Adams site – the one containing the 80 acres north of the road.

Tribune, May 6 1908

The commission unanimously selected what was called the Adams site – the one containing the 80 acres north of the road. It was thought that Governor Hanly might prefer the Gulliams land, so the selection was left to him. He heartily concurred in the commission’s choice.

The Governor will order condemnation proceedings if an unreasonable price is asked for the 142 acres not yet optioned, but he suggested that another attempt be made to secure this land at what it was worth. Commissioners Moore, Babcock, and Holman will be here Thursday with the superintendent of the Vandalia railroad to go over the ground, locate the switch and take steps to drive a well and survey the site.

The Tribune believes that a new era has dawned on Rockville.

Tribune, May 6 1908

The Tribune believes that a new era has dawned on Rockville. The location of this State hospital will in time prove of great benefit. In attracting the attention of capital for investment in an electric railway, the hospital is  equivalent to one good town in the matter of travel. It means that  a route from Indianapolis to Rockville, and possibly to Montezuma, already feasible, cannot much longer fail to become a reality. The hospital is the beginning of a great philanthropic work destined to be of inestimable value to humanity. It will save thousands of lives. The institution is one that should be welcomed by any community. Instead of being dangerous to the public health, it will be the means of making Parke county’s death rate from consumption smaller than that of any other Indiana community. Anybody who has visited a State institution of this kind knows how greatly our community has been favored.

The people of Rockville and vicinity, with very few exceptions, have worked solidly together in this enterprise. They impressed all concerned with their sincerity and public spirit, and in doing this they have an object lesson that will be of future benefit. It shows that the pessimistic opinion, often expressed, especially of late, that our people “won’t do anything,” is not necessarily true. It shows us what we can do when we get busy. It means that we are going to get busy and do things for ourselves and our

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