History of the Sanatorium: May 3 1922

Tribune may 3 1922

Newspaper: Tribune
Published: May 3 1922

Unknown – part of a larger document

” While excavating at the site for the new superintendent’s building a short distance south of the west ward of the State sanatorium, last Wednesday, three places where furnaces had once been in operation were disclosed. The bottom tiers of the brick were still in place and the burned ground as well as ashes clearly marked the dimensions of the furnaces. They were seven feet long and about two feet wide, all in line and about four feet apart. The fact that they were built of brick, were only seven feet long and three of them, at once disproved the theory that they might have been sugar camp furnaces. In the early days nobody ever built such furnaces of brick or more than one long trench for the row of kettles. While L. W. Brown who has the work in charge was speculating on the peculiar find, Henry Godden, who remembered the place as it was before the civil war said a distillery was located there. If this is true, whose distillery was it? Nobody of whom we have inquired knows.

“Will some old reader, if he knows, tell why those furnaces were there at least seventy years ago. “

Tribune May 3 1922

C. E. Lambert’s abstract books show that the land was entered March 12, 1831 by Jonathan Garrison, that Randall and Guest owned it afterwards, also Charles Cooper, who sold to Andrew and John A. McCurdy. This brings the ownership down to the fifties. Will some old reader, if he knows, tell why those furnaces were there at least seventy years ago. “

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